Program

Presenters are invited to explore the concurrent sessions and abstracts available on the interactive Online Draft Program   The Grid Schedule is available at 2018 AFHVS Concurrent Grid Updated June 5 2018

AFHVS ASFS Program .pdf

Note that this is only a draft program. Building and room assignments for concurrent sessions are subject to change. If you observe errors in your information, please notify us at uwciasinfo@gmail.com. 

Join the online experience! Use the conference’s social media hashtag: #foodstudies18

Find your way to conference sessions and event locations with the AFHVS Campus Walking Map and Free Bus June 2018

  • Pre-Conference Field Sessions

    EPIC Systems HQ

    • Tour leaves the Pyle Center at 1:30, arriving at 2. Tour leaves EPIC at 4:30, returning to the Pyle Center at 5pm
    • Twenty participants maximum
    • Cost: $20
    • Tour guide: Michelle

    Epic is a local health software company.  Founded in 1979 in Madison, 190 million patients have a current electronic record in EPIC. The 950 acre campus features five distinctive building clusters with seven eating venues that serve 6,000-8,000 meals a day.

    This tour will have two parts. From 2-3pm we will hear from Andy Patterson, about their food system vision and strategies; a purchasing agent, Sunny McDaniel, about sourcing food to support local, sustainable menu choices; and the grounds crew on maintaining a cook’s garden. From 3-4pm, participants are invited on a tour of the campus led by Andy. Each building cluster is unique in design and features art from local and regional artists. Sustainability is a key organizing principle for the campus. The buildings draws 55% of their energy from renewables – solar, wind and geothermal. The campus is home to the largest green roof in the world. For more information on Epic, go to: http://www.epic.com/


    The Organic and Sustainable Agriculture Collection at the Wisconsin Historical Society

    • Group meets at the Wisconsin Historical Society Library (2nd Floor) at 11am for an hour tour of collections.
    • UW Madison campus
    • Maximum 20 participants, minimum 4 (wait list will open additional sessions)
    • Cost: Free
    • Guide: Julia Wong

    The Organic and Sustainable Agriculture Collection is a new addition to the Society’s archives, assembled for researchers to document the story of the food movement. The conference will include presentations from researchers currently using the collection. The collection consists of personal papers and organizational records which document the organic farming movement from the papers of F.H. (Franklin Hiram) King (b. 1848-d. 1911), UW-Madison professor of agricultural physics and author of the 1911 book Farmers of Forty Centuries, to ongoing organic farming conference recordings of the Midwest Organic and Sustainable Education Service (MOSES), 1990-present. Topics documented in the collection include the development of farmers’ organizations and state certification programs, the movement for a national organic standard and public input on this process, and related topics such as agricultural impact on the environment and conservation resource programs, animal welfare, organic research funding, and international initiatives in sustainable agriculture.

    Time permitting, the group may also see some samples of other strengths of the archives, such as the Menu Collection, Civil Rights, Mass Communications, or the Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research. See also the collection page for further description:

    https://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Records/Article/CS4440


    Farley Center/Badger Rock Field Session

    • Bus leaves the Pyle Center at 1:30pm, returning 5pm
    • Madison & Verona, WI
    • Maximum 35 participants, minimum 15
    • Cost: $25
    • Field guides: Seth Riley, Farm Manager, The Farley Center; Sarah Karlson, Farmer-in-Residence, and Marcia Caton Campbell, Center for Resilient Cities/Badger Rock Center

    This tour will visit two of Dane County’s social justice programs working in the food and agriculture space. The Farley Center is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting ecological sustainability, social justice and peace. We will learn about their farm incubator, where prospective farmers are provided with land, equipment and training to help them develop their businesses. The group will then visit Badger Rock Center, built to LEED Platinum standards on a 3.85-acre agricultural site on Madison’s racially and ethnically diverse South Side. This three-way community-based partnership emphasizes the role of urban agriculture in neighborhood resilience. Center for Resilient Cities, a nonprofit urban land trust that owns and operates Badger Rock, leads the Badger Rock Neighborhood Center and the Community Market. Badger Rock Middle School, which calls Badger Rock home, is a public charter middle school created to teach students through project-based learning and the lens of environmental sustainability and resilience. Community GroundWorks (CGW), the urban agriculture partner, provides seed-to-table urban agriculture and culinary instruction to BRMS students during the school year thanks to the season-extending greenhouse and hoop house.

    For more information about Badger Rock School, visit the website:  https://badgerrock.madison.k12.wi.us

    For more information about the Farley Center, visit the website: http://farleycenter.org/


    Milwaukee Food System Innovations

    Milwaukee is home to many entrepreneurial food businesses and urban agriculture projects throughout the city. Milwaukee, through the HOME GR/OWN initiative empowers residents to transform neighborhoods by transforming vacant lots into community assets that spark new economic opportunities around local, healthy food production and distribution and healthy, vibrant new community spaces. To take in some of what the city offers, we organized two separate tours.

    Session A is on Milwaukee’s Southside.

    • Bus leaves the Pyle Center at 8 a.m., returning to the Pyle Center at 4:30 pm
    • Milwaukee, WI
    • Maximum 12 participants, minimum 8
    • Cost: $40 (lunch at your own cost at Braise)
    • Field guides: Eloisa Gomez (Milwaukee County UW Extension) and Greg Lawless (UW Extension)

    This group will visit:

    Session B is on the Northside.

    • Bus leaves the Pyle Center at 8 a.m., returning to the Pyle Center at 4:30 pm
    • Milwaukee, WI
    • Maximum 12 participants, minimum 8
    •  Cost: $40 (lunch at your own cost at Tandem)
    •  Field guides: Steve Ventura (UW-Madison Soil Science & Env. Studies) and Monica White (UW-Madison Community and Environmental Sociology)

    This group will visit:


    Sustainable Meal Hackathon

    All conference participants are encouraged to share their ideas for the Hackathon at www.sustainablemeal.net.

    • 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
    • Mosse Humanities, 7th floor gallery, Department of Art (corner of Park and University, enter through the Art door on the ground level), UW Madison campus
    • Maximum 50 participants (no minimum)
    • Cost: $30 (includes lunch)
    • Field guides: Spatula & Barcode (Laurie Beth Clark & Michael Peterson) with Underground Butcher’s Jonny Hunter, Michelle Miller (UW CIAS), Kay Jensen, JenEhr Farm, Sarah Khan, Food-Gender-Science-Power and others

    Defining and achieving sustainable diet is a complex, multi-layered challenge. Recent efforts to define a sustainable diet reduce the concept to nutrition, environmental sustainability, valued workforce, animal welfare and local economies. There are many other aspects that ideally are considered, such as how cultural factors shape foodways, the historical context of food provisioning, and power dynamics. There is little discussion and no agreement on what constitutes a sustainable diet, leaving it up to market instruments and fashion. A hackathon fulfills two purposes: gathering peoples’ creativity to solve a problem, but also redefining a problem by discussing it. Discussing the problem transforms our own perspective of it, sheds light on how others interpret it, and collectively develops a shared understanding.

    This day-long workshop will bring together conference goers with a local team of chefs, artists, farmers, scientists, food writers, sociologists, anthropologists, and other yet-to-be-imagined interested parties.  Together the group will explore sustainable diets through gaming, deep conversation, and experiential activities to create a complex framework for thinking about what makes a meal sustainable. Hackathon participants will bring those data collected at www.sustainablemeal.net into the framework development. Participants will discuss the outcomes of the hackathon at a panel session later in the conference and create a framework representation for conference goers to consider.

    This is the second in a series of workgroups convened by Spatula & Barcode (http://spatulaandbarcode.net/). The first was convened together with Juan Carlos Rocha at the Programme on Climate and Society conference in Oaxaca, Mexico (November 2017).

    Food intervention at Hacking Sustainable Diets, Oaxaca, Mexico, November 2017


    Ethnobotany in Ho Chunk Territory

    • Leaves the Pyle Center at 8:00am, returning 5:30pm
    • Maximum 30 participants, minimum 15
    • Cost: $50 (includes lunch)
    • Guide: Bill Gartner, UW Geography

    Native peoples, such as the Ho Chunk Nation, have long called southcentral Wisconsin home. They also played an important role in in shaping the terrestrial scene here, from the time of the receding Late Quaternary ice sheets to EuroAmerican settlement of the area in the mid-19th century. This tour will highlight the roles of nature and culture in shaping the surprisingly diverse ecosystems of southcentral Wisconsin, including prairies, oak openings, closed-canopy deciduous forests, mixed coniferous-deciduous forests, riparian forests, and wetlands.   Native peoples used hundreds of plants from these communities for food, fiber, medicine, and myriad other uses.   Archaeological and paleoecological evidence suggests that native peoples have actively managed their botanical resources since mid-Holocene times, primarily through planting, tending, selective tree felling, and burning. We will also see Pre-Columbian components of the built landscape in southcentral Wisconsin such as effigy mounds (ca 700-1050 AD) and relict agricultural fields. As we will see, native peoples were the original organic and sustainable agriculturalists in Wisconsin, practicing sophisticated raised field agriculture in marginal environments by 1000 AD.

    Field Trip Itinerary

     

    Stop 1) 8:00 AM Departure: Observatory Drive Overlook

    Landmarks: Scenic Overview of Lake Mendota

    Topics: Field Trip Overview; Late Quaternary and Holocene Environmental History of the Four Lakes of Madison (Dejope); Winkler Pollen/Limnology Core.

     

    Stop 2) Mendota Mental Health Institute

    Landmarks: Effigy Mounds (Raptors and Water Spirit); Forest Succession (Oak Opening to Closed Canopy Maple Forest)

    Topics: Social Relations and Spatial Structures of Effigy Mounds; Effigy Mounds and Ho Chunk History; Pre-Columbian and Historic Period Fire Regimes; Native American Resource Management.

     

    Stop 3) Natural Bridges State Park (Lunch Stop)

    Landmarks: Raddatz Rockshelter; Forest Hike (ca 1.2 miles)

    Topics: Archaic Stage Subsistence Economies (hunting, gathering, fishing); Medicinal Ethnobotany (Medicinal Plants are identified along the forest trail).

     

    Stop 4) Hulburt Creek Raised Fields (County H and Birchwood Rd)

    Landmarks: Raised Fields

    Topics: Agricultural Origins, Dispersals, and Landscapes in Native North America; Raised Field Agroecology


     

    Comparative Dairy-Systems and Cheesemaking Tour and Tasting

     

    • Departs from the Pyle Center at 9am and returns to Pyle Center at 5pm.
    •  Maximum 40 participants, minimum 15
    • Cost: $60 (includes lunch)
    • Tour guide: Kate Anderson

    First stop is Larson Acres, a 2,800-cow confinement dairy (CAFO) that prides itself on community-involvement, environment, and animal welfare. We’ll see the feed bunkers, calf barns, maternity area, milking parlor, and a modern cross-vent barn. We may have time for Ed Larson’s Museum of dairy history. Check out Larsonacres.com for a preview. Second stop is the Uplands Dairy, a 230-cow seasonal, pasture-based, rotational grazing dairy farm that participates in the apprenticeship and beginning farmer programs. It is located in the “Driftless region” of southwest Wisconsin, known for its rolling hills, small farms, and vibrant local food communities. The third stop is the Uplands cheesemaking creamery, which produces hard, aged cheeses like those from the Alpine regions of France and Switzerland. Its Pleasant Ridge Reserve is the most-awarded cheese in American History. We’ll tour the facility and get a cheese tasting. Visit uplandscheese.com for a preview. Before heading back to Madison, we’ll facilitate a group discussion about the farm systems we’ve visited, including the relative merits of CAFOs vs. smaller farms and confinement vs. grazing.


     

     

  • Presenter Information

    Information for Panel Presenters

    These guidelines are for presenters in panel sessions and Roundtables.

    Social Media: #foodstudies18

    Length of Presentations:

    Your presentation is accepted within the pre-organized panel with which you submitted it. You and your colleagues will have one, 100-minute session for your organized panel. Typically, presenters take approximately 15 minutes to discuss their contribution. Afterwards, the floor is opened for 20 minutes discussion and questions from the audience. It is best to take questions after all have presented, rather than after individual presentations, to ensure ample time for all papers to be heard.

    Do note: the amount of time you have for presenting depends on how many papers are in your 100-minute session.

    • For sessions with 4 papers, please limit your talk to 15 minutes.
    • For sessions with 5 papers, please limit your talk to 12 minutes.
    • For sessions with 3 or fewer presenters, please limit your presentation to 20 minutes.

    Please keep in mind that it takes time to transition from paper to paper, including accessing any powerpoint presentations you have, and that you need to leave time for questions. If your session has arranged, in advance, to have a discussant, please account for the that speaker’s time when planning the length of your talk.

     

    Technology:

    Presentations assigned to Pyle Center:

    Pyle Center Van Hise Lounge (lower level)) is the Speaker Ready Room. Presenters scheduled for sessions at Pyle Center are encouraged to bring their thumb drive to the Speaker Ready Room to test their content on one of the available laptops no less than 2 hours prior to their scheduled presentation. The Speaker Ready Room is open 8:00am – 4:00pm on 6/13, 8:00am – 5:30pm on 6/14 & 6/15, and 8:00am – 10:00am on 6/16.

    • The Speaker Ready Room will have network folders for you to save your presentation(s), labeled by session letter and number. Once saved in the network folder, presentations will automatically be available to view in the appropriate presentation room.
    • Double check that media with a presentation (videos, audio, pictures) display properly while in the Speaker Ready Room.
    • Session rooms are equipped with in-room computers and projection systems. The use of personal laptops is discouraged. Bring your presentation on a thumb drive, even if you bring your own laptop.
    • The software on the in-room computers will support, Word, Power Point, and Excel. Mac-based presentations (Keynote, Pages, Numbers, etc.) can be saved as PDF’s.
    • An in-room phone is available if technical assistance is needed.
    • Please arrive to your session early to set up your presentation and test any media.

    Presentations assigned to Memorial Union:

    • Mac laptops will be available in all session rooms at Memorial Union.
    • The Macs run Microsoft Office Suite, a PDF reader and Keynote.
    • Bring your presentation on a thumb drive even if you bring your laptop.
    • A laptop will already be connected to the in-room AV system. Insert your thumb drive and open your presentation.
    • If you are using your own laptop, both a VGA and MDMI connector will be available.
    • An in room phone is available if technical assistance is needed.
    • Please arrive early to your session to set up your presentation and test any media.

    Presentations assigned to Memorial Library:

    • All presenters at Memorial Library will need to bring their own laptop.
    • Both VGA and HDMI connections are available.
    • Please arrive early to your session to set up your presentation and test any media.

    Presentations scheduled at the Wisconsin Historical Society Auditorium:

    • All presenters at WHS Auditorium will need to bring their own laptop.
    • The projector is equipped with a VGA connection only.
    • Please arrive early to your session to set up your presentation and test any media.

    Presentations/Roundtables assigned to Lowell Center:

    • NO AV services are available for sessions assigned to Lowell Center.

     

    Information for Session Chairs

    Each session has a Chair. The Chair is a volunteer, often one of the presenters from the session, who is responsible for helping the session run smoothly–reminding presenters of time guidelines, usually introducing each presenter, moderating the question and answer time, ensuring that all powerpoint presentations are cued and ready to go, communicating with conference planners if there are any technological problems. To keep the busy conference schedule running smoothly, Chairs will have to cut off presenters who go beyond their allotted time.

     

    Information for Roundtable and Creative Sessions

    You and your co-presenters will have autonomy to organize one, 100-minute session, around the theme outlined in your abstract. Round tables/ alternative sessions will not have projector, screens, or computing access. If your presentation requires visual aids, we suggest you bring handouts or a laptop computer. Wi-Fi will be available in the meeting space.

    Poster Session

    We invite you to prepare a poster outlining the key contributions of your research paper to be presented during the poster session at the conference. Posters will be attached to presentation boards with the dimensions of 4 feet by 4 feet. Please arrive at Pyle Center Alumni Lounge between 8:00 AM – 11:00AM on 6/15 to set up your poster. When you arrive at the session location, you will find your location assignment and hang your poster. Conference organizers will provide boards and tacks for you to hang your paper.

    You should expect to give short, informal overviews of your research topic and findings to fellow conference attendees who will be circulating through the poster session.  You are expected to be at your poster from 12:00 – 1:30 pm.  Most attendees will want to roam through and look at various posters, so they will likely spend just a few minutes with you before moving on.

    The Poster Session takes place during the lunch break on 6/15 from 12:10pm – 1:30 pm in the Pyle Center Alumni Lounge.   Please leave your poster up until 3:00pm for registrants to view posters throughout the afternoon.  Pick your poster up by 3:00pm. Unclaimed posters will be brought to the front desk.

    This is an “on your own” lunch, however, there is an option to purchase a Bag Lunch from Working Class Catering during the registration process. Find out more about Working Class Catering on the Social Events panel on the Program page. Please note, no “carry – in“ lunches are allowed at the poster session.

    Please either bring your poster, or have the poster printed at one of the following, Madison-based poster printing shops:

    Any poster not picked up after the poster session will be recycled

     

  • Featured Speakers

    Donna Neuwirth, Wormfarm Institute
    Ferment! Reception
    Wednesday, June 13th, 2018, 5:00PM
    Tripp Commons, Memorial Union

    Support Wormfarm Institute with your t-shirt purchase. See the t-shirt here; Agri Culture Shock. You will have the option to purchase a t-shirt during the registration process. The cost of the t-shirt is $25 (plus tax). All proceeds will go toward the Wormfarm Institute’s annual Fermentation Fest held in the wilds of the Baraboo Hills, north of Madison, WI. Fermentation Fest is a Live Culture Convergence celebrating food, farming and fermentation. The signature Farm/Art DTour, a 50 mile self- guided drive through scenic working lands punctuated by temporary art installations, pasture performances and more, is on a biennial schedule and will return to the Fest in Autumn 2018.

    Donna Neuwirth is co-founder and Executive Director of Wormfarm Institute whose mission is to integrate culture and agriculture to build thriving communities across the rural/urban continuum. After many years in art and theater in Chicago, Neuwirth and co-founder Jay Salinas moved to a small farm in Wisconsin. Seduced by the life in the soil and struck by the parallels in process between farming and art making, they formed the Wormfarm in 2000 and began an Artist Residency program.

    A self-described impresario with a BFA in theater from The School of Art Institute of Chicago, Donna has led numerous projects inspired by, and centered at the fertile intersection of culture and agriculture including Wormfarm’s annual Fermentation Fest – A Live Culture Convergence which received both NEA Our Town and ArtPlace grants in their initial year of funding. Former NEA Chair Rocco Landesman has called Wormfarm “the poster child for creative placemaking”.


    Ricardo Salvador, Union of Concerned Scientists
    Public Lecture: Science Is Not “Neutral”: Why Science Is Inherently Political – The Case of Agroecology
    Thursday, June 14th, 2018, 5:30PM – 6:45PM
    Wisconsin State Historical Society Auditorium (Library Mall, UW – Madison)

     As the senior scientist and director of the Food and Environment Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists, Ricardo Salvador works with citizens, scientists, economists, and politicians to transition our current food system into one that grows healthy foods while employing sustainable and socially equitable practices. Before coming to UCS, he served as a program officer for food, health and well-being with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, associate professors of agronomy at Iowa State University, and as an Extension educator with Texas A&M University.


    Rowen White, Sierra Seeds
    Evening Program Address (Ticket to the evening program is required)
    Friday, June 15th, 2018; Doors Open at 5:30 PM; Plated Dinner at 6:00 PM;  Rowen White, Sierra Seeds speaks at 6:30 PM
    DeJope Residence Hall

    Rowen White is a Seed Keeper from the Mohawk community of Akwesasne and a passionate activist for seed sovereignty. She is the director and founder of Sierra Seeds, an innovative organic seed cooperative focusing on local seed production and education, based in Nevada City, California. She teaches creative seed training immersions around the country within tribal and small farming communities. She weaves stories of seeds, food, culture and sacred Earth stewardship on her blog, Seed Songs. Rowen also serves on the Seed Savers Exchange Board of Directors as Chair.


    Poke and Provoke
    Public Lecture
    Saturday, June 16th, 2018; 10:30 AM – noon
    Wisconsin Historical Society Auditorium

    Featuring:

    • Hugh Campbell, Centre for Sustainability, University of Otago, New Zealand
    • Franklin Sage, Director, Dine’ Policy Institute, Dine’ College, Tsaile, AZ
    • Mary Hendrickson, Department of Rural Sociology, University of Missouri
    • Clare Hinrichs, Department of Agricultural Economics, Sociology and Education, Penn State
    • Claudia Serrato, graduate student at University of Washington, lecturer at Cal Poly Pomona, co-founder of Across our Kitchen Tables, and our guest chef.
    • Jim Goodman, Wisconsin beef farmer, long-time food sovereignty activist and board member for Family Farm Defenders, and President of the National Family Farm Coalition

    To encourage creative, improvisational and connected thinking, conference organizers offer this Poke and Provoke session to help us synthesize what we are learning. Six leaders in agroecological thinking and political action will come together to give a short, provocative statement based on their understanding, experience, observation, and research or share something that happened at the conference. Panelists will discuss these issues together. The audience will then be invited to participate in the discussion about ways forward to create a just food system.

  • Author Meet & Greet

    Room of One’s Own, Madison’s Independent Bookseller, will be on site to provide books written by authors presenting at the conference. Books may be purchased at Room’s table at the Pyle Center on the 2nd floor. On-site hours are Thursday and Friday, 9 a.m. -4:00 p.m. and Saturday, 9:00 a.m. -2:00 p.m.

    THURSDAY

    Jacques Rousseau – University of Cape Town, School of Management Studies; 11:00 a.m.- 12:00 p.m.
    Critical Thinking, Science and Pseudoscience: Why We Can’t Trust Our Brains

    Keefe Keeley – Savanna Institute, Madison, WI; 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
    The Driftless Reader

    Eloisa Gomez – University of Wisconsin – Extension, Milwaukee County; 1:00 p.m. –2:00 p.m.
    Somos Latinas: Voices of Wisconsin Latina Activists

    FRIDAY

    Jonathan Kauffman – San Francisco Chronicle; 11:00 a.m. 12:00 p.m.
    Hippie Food: How Back-to-the – Landers and Revolutionaries Changed the Way We Eat

    Elizabeth Hoover – Brown University, Department of American Studies; 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.
    The River Is In Us: Fighting Toxics in a Mohawk Community

    LOCAL AUTHORS 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

    Michael Bell – UW-Community and Environmental Sociology
    City of the Good: Nature, Religion, and the Ancient Search for What Is Right

    Patty Loew – Northwestern University
    Native Nations of Wisconsin, Seventh Generations Earth Ethics, Native People of Wisconsin

    Andrew Ruis – University of Wisconsin, Center for Education Research
    Eating to Learn, Learning to Eat: The Origins of School Lunch in the US

    Alfonso Morales – UW-Urban and Regional Planning and Landscape Architecture
    Cities of Farmers

    Steve Ventura & Lindsey Day Farnsworth – UW-Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies
    Good Food, Strong Communities: Promoting Social Justice Through Local and Regional Food Systems

    Annessa Babic – freelance; 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
    America’s Changing Icons: Constructing Patriotic Women from World War 1 to the Present

    Curt Meine – The Aldo Leopold Foundation, Baraboo, WI – 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
    The Driftless Reader

    Alice Weinreb – Loyola University Chicago, Department of History; 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
    Modern Hungers: Food and Power in 20th Century Germany

    Ty Matejowsky – University of Central Florida, Department of Anthropology; 2:00 p.m.- 3:00 p.m.
    Fast Food Globalization in the Provincial Philippines

    SATURDAY

    Elizabeth Zanoni – Old Dominion University, Department of History; 10:15a.m. – 11:15 a.m. *Pyle Center ATT Lounge*
    Migrant Marketplaces: Food and Italians in North and South America

     

     

     

  • Schedule At A Glance

    WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13

    7:30 AM – 4:00 PM                Registration Open – Pyle Center, Lobby

    4:30 PM – 7:00 PM                Registration Open – Memorial Union, Tripp Commons

    8:00 AM – 4:00 PM                Speaker Ready Room Open – Pyle Center, Van Hise Lounge (L06)

    8:00 AM – 5:30 PM                Pre-Conference Field Sessions/Workshop – Departing from Pyle Center

    4:00 PM – 4:30 PM                 Session Chair Training on AV equipment and Session Overview – Pyle Center, Room 327

    5:00 PM — 7:00 PM               Welcome Reception – Opening words at 5:45 PM – Memorial Union, Tripp Commons

    8:00 PM — 11:00 PM             Social On Your Own – Open Mic. Night – Memorial Union Terrace along the lake

    THURSDAY, JUNE 14

    7:30 AM – 5:30 PM                Registration and Information Open – Pyle Center, Lobby

    7:30 AM – 4:30 PM                Gallery Installation: “Leftovers and Open Questions: What is a Sustainable Meal?”, Mosse Humanities Building

    8:00 AM – 4:30 PM                Exhibits Open and Refreshments – Pyle Center, AT&T Lounge

    8:00 AM – 5:30 PM                Speaker Ready Room Open – Pyle Center, Van Hise Lounge (L06)

    8:30 AM – 10:10 AM              Concurrent Session A

    9:00 AM – 4:00 PM                Book Sales and Author Meet and Greet – Pyle Center, Second Floor South

    10:10 AM – 10:30 AM           Morning Break – Pyle Center, AT&T Lounge

    10:30 AM – 12:10 PM           AFHVS Association Business Meeting, Pyle Center Auditorium, Room 121

    10:30 AM – 12:10 PM           ASFS Association Business Meeting, Memorial Library, Room 126

    10:30 AM – 12:10 PM           Concurrent Session B

    12:10 PM – 1:30 PM              Lunch On Your Own – Library Mall Food Carts AFHV Food Cart Flyer 2018

    12:10 PM – 1:30 PM              Joint AFHVS/ASFS Association Board Meeting Lunch – Pyle Center, Alumni Lounge

    1:30 PM – 3:10 PM                Concurrent Session C

    3:10 PM – 3:30 PM                Afternoon Break – Pyle Center, AT&T Lounge

    3:10 PM – 5:30 PM               Editorial Board Meeting, Pyle Center, Room 310

    3:30 PM – 5:10 PM                Concurrent Session D

    5:30 PM –6:45 PM                 Keynote Address – Wisconsin Historical Society Auditorium

    7:00 PM – 9:00 PM                Graduate Student and Young Professionals Social – Pyle Center, Rooftop

    9:00 PM – 11:00 PM            Social On Your Own – Memorial Union Terrace – Free Live Outdoor Music at Memorial Union Terrace along Lake Mendota – Local recommendation: One of Madison’s most beloved bands plays at 9:00 p.m.  VO5 is a disco/funk playing 70’s covers and originals dressed in fantastic outfits and doing ABBA proud.  If you like to dance and be a part of a happy crowd, this local group is not to be missed.  Your nametag makes you a guest member of the Memorial Union

    FRIDAY, JUNE 15

    7:30 AM – 5:30 PM                Registration and Information Open – Pyle Center, Lobby

    7:30 AM – 4:30 PM                Gallery Installation: “Leftovers and Open Questions: What is a Sustainable Meal?”, Mosse Humanities Building

    8:00 AM – 4:30 PM                Exhibits Open and Refreshments – Pyle Center, AT&T Lounge

    8:00 AM – 11:30 AM               Posters Hung – Pyle Center, Alumni Lounge

    8:00 AM – 5:30 PM                Speaker Ready Room Open – Pyle Center, Van Hise Lounge (L06)

    8:30 AM – 10:10 AM              Concurrent Session E

    8:30 AM – 10:10 AM               Food, Culture, and Society Journal Board Meeting, Memorial Library, Room 126

    9:00 AM – 4:00 PM                Book Sales and Author Meet and Greet – Pyle Center, Second Floor South

    10:10 AM – 10:30 AM              Morning Break – Pyle Center, AT&T Lounge

    10:30 AM – 12:10 PM              Concurrent Session F

    10:30 AM – 12:10 PM             Agriculture and Human Values Journal Board Meeting – Memorial Union, Library 126

    12:10 PM – 1:30 PM              Poster Session with Presenters – Pyle Center, Alumni Lounge

    12:10 PM – 1:30 PM              On Your Own Lunch. Pick up for the pre-purchased Working Class bagged lunch is in the Pyle Center Lee Lounge. Ticket required for bagged lunch.

    1:30 PM – 3:00 PM                Poster Viewing – Pyle Center, Alumni Lounge

    1:30 PM – 3:10 PM                 Concurrent Session G

    3:10 PM – 3:30 PM                Afternoon Break – Pyle Center, AT&T Lounge

    3:30 PM – 5:10 PM                Concurrent Session H

    5:30 PM – 7:00 PM                Evening Program & 6:00 PM Plated Dinner Served – Ticket RequiredDejope Residence Hall

    7:00 PM – 10:00 PM              Dance with Live Music, Cash Bar, and Socializing – Dejope Residence Hall Lawn – Name Badge required

    9:00 PM – 11:00 PM            Social On Your Own – Memorial Union Terrace – Free Live Outdoor Music and Beverages On Your Own at Memorial Union Terrace.  A local favorite Paul Cebar  is one part early R&B, another part Pan-African Lilt, some Afro Cuban by way of New Orleans, and true Midwesterner!   Free and your nametag is your guest Union membership for the night.

    SATURDAY, JUNE 16

    6:00 AM – 2:00 PM                Dane County Farmer’s Market – To walk with a group, meet at 6:30a.m. at the Wisconsin Historical Museum on the capital square. Wear your name badge so we can identify each other.

    7:30 AM – 2:00 PM                Registration & Information Open – Pyle Center, Lobby

    8:00 AM – 12:00 PM              Exhibits Open and Refreshments – Pyle Center, AT&T Lounge

    8:00 AM – 10:00 AM              Speaker Ready Room Open – Pyle Center, Van Hise Lounge (L06)

    8:30 AM – 10:10 AM               Concurrent Session I

    9:00 AM – 2:00 PM                Book Sales and Author Meet and Greet – Pyle Center, Second Floor South

    10:10 AM – 10:30 AM             Morning Break – Pyle Center, AT&T Lounge

    10:15 AM – 11:15 AM              Author Meet and Greet – Elizabeth Zanoni – Pyle Center, AT&T Lounge

    10:30 AM – 12:10 PM            Concurrent Session J

    10:30 AM – 12:10 PM             Special Session Poke and Provoke Panel – Wisconsin Historical Society, Auditorium

    12:30 PM – 2:00 PM              Presidential Luncheon and Awards Presentation – Ticket Required – Pyle Center, Alumni Lounge

     

     

     

  • Social and Additonal Events

    Join the online experience! Use the conference’s social media hashtag: #foodstudies18

    WELCOME RECEPTION – Ferment!
    Date: Wednesday, June 13th, 2018
    Time: 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. with welcome from the conference co-chairs at 5:45 p.m.
    Location: Tripp Commons, Memorial Union
    Fee: Included in your registration (preregistration required)
    Located on the beautiful shores of Lake Mendota, in the heart of campus, join us for an evening of networking and local fare as we kick off the 2018 annual meeting.  All attendees will need a conference badge to attend. Registration is open at the Pyle Center on 6/13 from 7:00am – 4:00pm. Registration will be available at Tripp Commons from 4:30pm – 7:00pm. The Conference Co-Chairs will be giving a welcome at 6:00 p.m., followed by opening remarks from Associate Dean for Extension and Outreach, Doug Reinemann. The featured speaker for this event is Donna Neuwirth, Wormfarm Institute.

    GALLERY INSTALLATION: “Leftovers and Open Questions: What is a Sustainable Meal?”
    Date: Thursday, June 14th, 2018 – Friday, June 15th, 2018
    Time: 7:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. on 6/14 & 6/15 (closed Sat & Sun)
    Location: Mosse Humanities Building, 7th Floor Department of Art Gallery (across Library Mall, enter “Art” door on ground floor), 455 University Ave.
    Fee: Free
    Visit the 7th floor art gallery in Humanities to see an installation of the “leftovers and open questions” from a day-long “hackathon” in which conference participants and community stakeholders explored the conference theme through the question “What is a sustainable meal”? www.sustainablemeal.net

    GRADUATE STUDENT AND YOUNG PROFESSIONALS SOCIAL NETWORKING EVENT
    Date: Thursday, June 14, 2018
    Time: 7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
    Location: Pyle Center Rooftop Terrace
    Fee: Included in your registration
    Registered students are invited to a networking social specifically for the young professional on the Pyle Center Rooftop following the keynote address.  Beverages and snacks will be available along with a gorgeous view of Lake Mendota.  Join in the conversation!

    LGBT SOCIAL OUTING
    Date: Thursday, June 14, 2018
    Time: 9:00 p.m. – ?
    Location: Shamrock Bar & Grille
    This is an “on your own” event. After the Graduate Student and Young Professionals Social Networking Event, gather on the Pyle Center front steps for a walk/ride to the Shamrock Bar & Grill.
    Organizer Contact; Alex Cheser, alexcheser@gmail.com or 502-542-7668

    LIVE MUSIC ON THE MEMORIAL UNION TERRACE
    Date: Thursday, June 14
    Time: 9:00 p.m. -11:00 p.m.
    Location: Memorial Union Terrace
    Fee: Free.  Your name tag is your guest membership for adult beverages.
    A recommendation from the locals…..VO5 band is so much fun!  VO5 is a group of local musicians who dress up in the funkiest outfits and play 70’s covers and some originals.  The crowds love to dance to the music of ABBA, Earth Wind and Fire, and all the oldies but goodies.  If you want a local experience with a beloved band, stop by the Memorial Union for a beverage, fun live music, and a warm summer night along the Lake Mendota shore.  To cool off, grab a scoop of Babcock Hall Dairy Ice cream at the Union’s ice cream shop featuring flavors created by UW Dairy Science students.

    WORKING CLASS CATERING BAG LUNCH
    Date: Friday, June 15th, 2018
    Time: 12:10 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
    Location: Pyle Center , Lee Lounge for pick up (Ticket required)
    Fee: $14, upgrade to locally made Nesella Kombucha, +$2.50

    The poster session will be held on June 15, during the lunch break. This is an “on your own” meal, but this bag lunch option is a great way to enjoy some local fare and attend the poster session. Enjoy a picnic lunch prepared with some of Wisconsin’s finest ingredients by teens employed by Working Class Catering, a program area of the Goodman Community Center, a nonprofit organization on Madison’s near-east side. Working Class Catering is part of the Center’s larger Teenworks program that teaches food safety, science, English, math, culinary arts, urban agriculture and a Seed to Table curriculum to high school students, aged 15-21, who may be struggling at their current schools. Each bagged lunch will include a sandwich (vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free options), a side or two, and a drink that showcases Working Class Catering’s creativity and dedication to sourcing from farmers and food businesses that are working to build fair and resilient food systems here in Wisconsin.

    POSTER SESSION
    Date: Friday, June 15th, 2018
    Time: 12:10 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. with Presenters;  1:30-3:10pm will be open viewing.
    Location: Pyle Center Alumni Lounge

    The poster session will be held on June 15, during the lunch break. This is an “on your own” lunch hour but we hope you will come by the Alumni Lounge and see the great research your colleagues have prepared to present to you.

    EVENING PROGRAM & DINNER
    Date: Friday, June 15, 2018
    Event Time: 5:30 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. Plated Meal and Chef introduction promptly at 6:00 p.m. and the banquet address at 6:30 p.m.

    Location: Dejope Dining Hall, Lake Mendota Room
    Fee: $65.00 (preregistration required)
    Take the lakeshore path located behind Memorial Union, for a leisurely stroll to Dejope Dining Hall; Follow the signage along the trail. The evening will feature a locally curated and sourced menu, created in collaboration with UW Dining Services. The plated meals will be served promptly at 6:00 p.m. with words from the Chef.  Rowen White, Sierra Seeds, will give the banquet address at 6:30 p.m.. A dance will follow dinner, on the lawn outside Dejope and the adjacent fire circle. Graminy will be performing live “class-grass”, perfect for dancing!  For guests not wanting to walk, the Dejope Dining Hall is located along the #80 free campus bus route. See AFHVS Campus Walking Map and Free Bus For those interested in driving, Lot 62 located along Observatory Dr., is free after 4:30 p.m.

    Menu: A Taste of Home: Tlazocamati Tonanztin

    Elotitos

    corn cobs, hickory nut parmesan, cashew maple vinegar mayo, ground cayenne pepper

     Tostadas de Horno

    Kernal of Truth blue corn tortillas, black beans, Oneida bison machaca, avocado, cashew cream

     Sopa de Fideo

    summer squash, Bear Island flint corn, tepary beans, Lake Superior whitefish, micro greens

     Chile Relleños

    chile poblanos, cashew wild rice cheese, tomato serrano salsa, amaranth micros

     Paletas

    wild rice, pecans, maple syrup, vanilla ice pops

     Horchata

    quinoa, vanilla, Mexican bush sage, agave

    DANCE WITH LIVE MUSIC FEATURING GRAMINY AND HANDPHIBIANS
    Date:
    Friday, June 15, 2018
    Time: 7:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.
    Location: Dejope Dining Hall, north lawn tent
    Fee: Included in your registration fee (pre-registration required)
    Join us as we dance under the stars to the sounds of Graminy from 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. Beverages will be available for purchase.  Graminy is an award-winning ensemble that creates a unique and engaging soundscape they call “class-grass”.  They fuse components of grassroots and classical traditions, creating performances that are energetic and inquisitive, with quick changes and generous improvisation.  The group’s instrumentation blends a classical string trio (violins, viola and cello) with elements of a bluegrass rhythm section (mandolin, guitar and banjo) to create something, “…both complex and immediate, elusive and apparent.”

    A Madison party favorite, the Handphibians Brazilian Drum Group will be joining the fun towards the end of the evening from 9:00-9:30 p.m.!  Handphibians are a Madison Wisconsin based community percussion ensemble, dedicated to promoting the music and cultural traditions of Brazil.  Join the fun with a Brazilian drum beat as we close out the night.

    Take the lakeshore path located behind Memorial Union, for a leisurely stroll to Dejope Dining Hall. For guests not wanting to walk, the Dejope Dining Hall is located along the #80 free campus bus route.  See AFHVS Campus Walking Map and Free Bus  For those interested in driving, Lot 62 located along Observatory Dr., is free after 4:30 p.m.

     

    LIVE MUSIC ON THE MEMORIAL UNION TERRACE
    Date: Friday, June 15
    Time: 9:00 p.m. -11:00 p.m.
    Location: Memorial Union Terrace
    Fee: Free.  Your name tag is your guest membership for adult beverages.
    A recommendation from the locals…..Paul Cebar!   Madison is known as a summer outdoor festival town and Paul Cebar is one of the favorite bands.  One part early R&B, another part Pan-African Lilt, some Afro Cuban by way of New Orleans, and true Midwesterner!  Great musicianship, original music, and a lovely summer night!    If you want a local experience, stop by the Memorial Union for a beverage, fun live music, and a warm summer night along the Lake Mendota shore.  To cool off, grab a scoop of Babcock Hall Dairy Ice cream at the Union’s ice cream shop featuring flavors created by UW Dairy Science students.

    DANE COUNTY FARMERS MARKET
    Date: Saturday, June 16th, 2018
    Time: 6:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.  (Gather with other conference attendees at 6:30 a.m.)
    Location: Madison’s Capital Square.  If you would like to peruse with others, wear your name badge and meet at 6:30 a.m. in front of the Wisconsin Historical Museum at the corner of State Street and Carroll St.  Look for others wearing name badges.

    Before the conference kicks off on Saturday, we highly recommend you visit the country’s largest farmer’s markets on the Madison, WI capital square.  You will find the seasons best bounty of fresh produce, bakery, cheese, meat, eggs, jams, coffee, and flowers. There is also jewelry, musicians, artists, and the Madison community gathered April – October to feast on the local fair. All the items for sale are grown, raised, and produced in Wisconsin by the person behind the stand.

     

    PRESIDENTAL LUNCHEON AND  AWARDS PRESENTATION
    Date: Saturday, June 16th, 2018
    Time: 12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
    Location: Pyle Center, Alumni Lounge
    Fee: $10.00 (preregistration required)

    Presidential Address – Agriculture, Food, and Human Values Society

    Agriculture in the Plastic Age

    Jessica Goldberger, Washington State University

     

    Presidential Address – Association for the Study of Food and Society

    Suffering and Social Theory: Towards an Epistemology of Pleasure and Joy

    Krishnendu Ray, New York University

    The Alumni Lounge features floor to ceiling windows with stunning views of Lake Mendota and access to an outside veranda. The event features a locally sourced menu, served buffet style. The Pyle Center is an avid supporter of local shelters and all leftover food is sent to local shelters to support their mission.

  • Evening Program Guest Chef

    CLAUDIA

    serrato

    P’urhépecha | Huasteca | Xicanx


    XICANA INDIGENA DECOLONIAL FEMINISTSerrato Headshot

    For nearly two decades, Claudia Serrato, (she/her/they/their) dedicates herself to the study of food, the body, healing, and decolonization. In 1998, questioning ethnic, cultural, and racialized determinants of health that placed her at risk for food related diseases, Claudia took preventative health measures by returning to her ancestral foodways, a Native and plant-based diet, an “Indigenous Veganism.” Eating earth-based, fed her creative passion to produce critical Xicanx short reflective writings on decolonizing the diet and the coloniality of food first featured in 2008 on the blog, Decolonial Food for Thought. In 2011, while expecting, Claudia indigenized her prenatal nutrition and seasoned her amniotic fluid with ancestral flavors towards decolonizing her baby’s taste buds. This womb ecology informs Serrato’s truth-telling and critical decolonial Xicana feminist sazón that has been tasted, heard, smelled, touched and/or seen in and out of institutions, community, home, and kitchen spaces. In la cocina, since the age of five, chef Claudia cooks up plant (raw/vegan) and Indigenous based foods at Native food summits and gatherings throughout Turtle Island, alongside Indigenous grassroot to high profile chefs. She also caters community events and hosts pop up dinners for Cocina Manakurhini, a business she co-found. In the community, Serrato teaches cooking classes, facilitates food demonstrations and workshops, and provides professional consultation services to individuals and organizations. Serrato is also the cofounder of Across Our Kitchen Tables, a women of color culinary resource and network hub. As a multi-issue social justice public activist scholar, Claudia speaks at university campuses, classrooms, cultural gatherings, and radio programming on decolonization, Indigenous veganism, womb ecology, and Native women in the kitchen. She can be heard on Feminist Magazine, Animal Voices, Toasted Sister and Native American Calling. In the academy, Claudia Serrato is a PhD candidate of Anthropology from the University of Washington and holds two lecturer positions at Cal Poly Pomona for the department of Ethnic and Women’s Studies and Regenerative Studies. She holds two MA’s in Anthropology and Mexican American Studies and a BA in Gender, Ethnicity and Multicultural Studies. In her time in “betwixt and between,” Claudia enjoys (w)riting and cooking flavors of decolonial love, all while learning about local regional wild plant foods, seed saving, growing food, and nurturing her children by continuing to decolonize their palates.

    Evening Program (sold separately during the registration process)

    Plated Meal Served Promptly at 6:00 p.m. with words from the Chef Claudia Serrato.

    Rowen White will give the program talk at 6:30 p.m.

    Menu

    A Taste of Home: Tlazocamati Tonanztin

     

    Elotitos

    corn cobs, hickory nut parmesan, cashew maple vinegar mayo, ground cayenne pepper

     

    Tostadas de Horno

    Kernal of Truth blue corn tortillas, black beans, Oneida bison machaca, avocado, cashew cream

     

    Sopa de Fideo

    summer squash, Bear Island flint corn, tepary beans, Lake Superior whitefish, micro greens

     

    Chile Relleños

    chile poblanos, cashew wild rice cheese, tomato serrano salsa, amaranth micros

     

    Paletas

    wild rice, pecans, maple syrup, vanilla ice pops

     

    Horchata

    quinoa, vanilla, Mexican bush sage, agave

     

  • Conference Planning Committees

    PROGRAM COMMITTEE

    • Michael Bell, University of Wisconsin, Program Committee Co-chair
    • Michelle Miller, University of Wisconsin, Program Committee Co-chair
    • Amanda McMillan Lequieu, University of Wisconsin, Program Manager
    • Marcia Caton Campbell, Center for Resilient Cities
    • Rebecca Shenton, Administrator, AFHVS
    • Caroline Brock, University of Missouri
    • Monica White, University of Wisconsin
    • Lilly Fink Shapiro, University of Michigan
    • Jennifer Berg, New York University
    • Beth Forrest, Culinary Institute of America
    • Andrew Ruis, University of Wisconsin
    • Marcy Ostrom, Washington State University, Incoming President, AFHVS
    • Jessica Goldberger, Washington State University, President, AFHVS
    • Krishnendu Ray, New York University, President, ASFS

    HOST COMMITTEE

    • Michael Bell, University of Wisconsin, Host Committee Co-chair
    • Michelle Miller, Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems, Host Committee Co-chair
    • Janet Gilmore, Department of Planning and Landscape Architecture, Center for the Study of Upper Midwest Cultures
    • Alfonso Morales, Department of Planning and Landscape Architecture
    • Sarah Lloyd, Wisconsin Farmers Union
    • Steve Ventura, Department of Soil Science and the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies
    • Monica White, Department of Community and Environmental Sociology
    • Jennifer Gaddis, Department of Civil Society and Community Studies
    • Heidi Busse, Global Health Initiative
    • Vincent Cryns, School of Medicine and Public Health
    • Diane Mayerfeld, University of WI – Extension SARE
    • Erin Peot, University of WI – Extension
    • Alan Turnquist, Agroecology Program
    • Dan Cornelius, Intertribal Agriculture Council
    • Samson Srok, FH King Students for Sustainable Agriculture
    • Bill Gartner, Department of Geography
    • David Beriss, University of New Orleans, President, Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (SAFN)